Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52 Page 53 Page 54 Page 55 Page 56 Page 57 Page 58 Page 59 Page 60 Page 61 Page 62 Page 63 Page 64 Page 65 Page 66 Page 67 Page 68 Page 69 Page 70 Page 71 Page 72 Page 73 Page 74 Page 75 Page 76 Page 77 Page 78 Page 79 Page 80 Page 81 Page 82 Page 83 Page 84 Page 85 Page 86 Page 87 Page 88 Page 89 Page 90 Page 91 Page 92 Page 93 Page 94 Page 95 Page 96 Page 97 Page 98 Page 99 Page 100 Page 101 Page 102 Page 103 Page 104 Page 105 Page 106 Page 107 Page 108 Page 109 Page 110 Page 111 Page 112 Page 113 Page 114 Page 115 Page 11639 ART B eaufort is picture-perfect, and so are the visionaries who capture its natural beauty and culture on can- vas. Seeing is believing. The heartbeat of Beaufort’s vibrant, creative community is the Beaufort Arts Council. Supported by 600 members, the council nurtures and promotes local, creative minds and provides opportunities for artists to exhibit, perform and create art. It also offers educational and training opportunities to students of all ages. It’s why Beaufort consistently earns recog- nition as one of America’s top small arts towns. Hundreds of local artists representing every dis- cipline, and a diverse array of venues including several galleries, along with festivals and special events, showcase the area’s talents. RichinAfricantraditions,theGullahculture influences artists of all types. Jonathan Green crafts brightly colored lithographs and paint- ings that reflect his upbringirt. His creations are often featured at ARTWorks. Throughout the area, basket weavers create intricately patterned and coiled sweetgrass baskets, a fading handi- craft that can be traced back hundreds of years through slavery to Africa. Anita Singleton-Prather – better known as Aunt Pearlie Sue – shares Gullah history and language through her colorful, costumed story- telling and through the musical group, Gullah Kinfolk. For more Gullah lore and crafts, check out the Penn Center Heritage Days Celebra- tion, held each November at Penn Center. Novelist Pat Conroy called the area home, finding inspiration here for some of his most famous works, including The Prince of Tides and The Great Santi- ni, both of which were also made into successful movies filmed in the area. This year USCB will host the inaugural “Pat Conroy Literary Festival,” October 20-22, 2016, featuring writers and scholars from all over the south.