Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52 Page 53 Page 54 Page 55 Page 56 Page 57 Page 58 Page 59 Page 60 Page 61 Page 62 Page 63 Page 64 Page 65 Page 66 Page 67 Page 68 Page 69 Page 70 Page 71 Page 72 Page 73 Page 74 Page 75 Page 76 Page 77 Page 78 Page 79 Page 80 Page 81 Page 82 Page 83 Page 84 Page 85 Page 86 Page 87 Page 88 Page 89 Page 90 Page 91 Page 92 Page 93 Page 94 Page 95 Page 96 Page 97 Page 98 Page 99 Page 100 Page 101 Page 102 Page 103 Page 104 Page 105 Page 106 Page 107 Page 108 Page 109 Page 110 Page 111 Page 112 Page 113 Page 114 Page 115 Page 116HISTORY 14 Penn Center “One of the most significant African American historicalandculturalinstitutionsinexistence.” • One of the country’s first schools for freed slaves. • The 50-acre Historic Campus was designated a National Historic Land mark District in 1974. • Home of the York W. Bailey Museum.  843.838.2432 16 Penn Center Circle West St.HelenaIsland South Carolina www.PennCenter.com The birth of Beaufort lives on at every turn today Beaufort is a living landmark. Birthed 450 years ago, when French explorer Jean Ribaut sailed into Port Royal sound, the second-deepest natural harbor on the East Coast. That’s the history that’s still pulsing through the legends, through times of prosperi- ty, grandeur, turmoil … and rebirth. Spanish, French and British explorers strug- gled to colonize the isolated seaside province dotted with American Indian tribes. Spain first ventured into area waters in 1514, but it was Ribaut who claimed the Port Royal Harbor and established the short-lived settlement of Charlesfort, now known as Parris Island. The Spaniards returned in 1566, building Fort San Felipe and the Santa Elena settlement on Par- ris Island. Their dominion endured until 1587, when the British drove them out of the region. By 1711, when the English formally chartered Beaufort, the area had evolved into a shipbuilding hub, but growth was tempered by the constant threat of American Indian hostilities and foreign invasion. As protection, the British constructed Fort Frederick in 1735. In 1712, the Parish Church of St. Helena was established at 505 Church St. Thomas Hey- ward Jr. (1746-1809), a signer of the Declaration of Independence, served as a parishioner during the Revolutionary War Era. Presently, a Hey- ward descendant volunteers at the Visitor Cen- ter. In the late 1700s, Beaufort and its bordering sea islands flourished as a center for indigo, cot- ton and rice. Wealthy plantation owners built